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Best Methods to Revive the Breed
From the Morgan Horse Magazine in 1942
 


In view of the widespread belief that the Morgan breed should be revived and
made once more an important factor in the horse industry, it is not
surprising that opinions differ as to the best methods to adopt for this
purpose. There is little if any question that the revival of the breed can
be accomplished; enough material of the type, fixed by inheritance, is
available for this. The question seems to be whether an exact revival of
the ancient Justin Morgan type should be attempted, or whether we should
take the best of the ancient type, improve it, and make it conform as
closely as possible to modern requirements.

Should the Justin Morgan Type Be Adopted?
Let us consider again the qualities which made Justin Morgan and his sons
famous. A further reference to Linsley shows that the qualities of Justin
Morgan which he regarded as worth preserving that make the Morgan valuable
today, and the faults which the horse had would be regarded as faults today
when found in Morgans. 'His compactness of form, his high and generous
spirit, combined with the most perfect tractibility, his bony, sinuous
limbs, his lofty style, and easy but vigorous action' are all points of
value. Every one of these admitted by horsemen as fundamental, with the
possible exception of the action, on which there is a difference of opinion,
some breeders wanting the highest and most brilliant action possible and
others simply 'easy but vigorous action'. Justin Morgan's prepotency as a
sire was an asset of the highest value, that is also universally regarded as
fundamental in a sire.

contributed by Joanne Curtis

 
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